Category Archives: Religion

The black-robed regiment on call . . .

Clergy to the pulpit barricades!

AURORA IL – Sunday evening, the Illinois Family Institute hosted several hundred Illinoisans who gathered at Aurora Christian School to hear Pastor, Author, and Oklahoma State Representative Dan Fisher call for Illinois clergy to “wake up” and join a modern day Black Robed Regiment.

 

The Black Robed Regiment was the name the British placed on the American clergy during the Founding Era (a backhanded reference to the black robes they wore). The British blamed the Black Robed Regiment for American Independence, and American leaders agreed

” We’re all Catholics now,” the Episcopal priest said at a rally in the Federal center a few years back, referring to the impingements on religious liberty fostered by ObamaCare.

Trouble is, in N. Illinois the RC priests are mostly liberals politically, if not in every other way.

However, I heard an excellent sermon pre-election day 2012 at St. John Vianney, Northbrook, at the 10 a.m. Latin mass. Quite good indeed.

Pope Francis exposed . . .

. . . as a shrewd and focused opponent of a very bad curia:

The first non-European Pope was elected to do one thing: reform the Roman Curia, the pitifully disorganised, corrupt and lazy central machinery of the church. He is determined to pull it off — but he’s 77 and has part of a lung missing. When he looks at his watch during long Masses in St Peter’s, it’s not just because elaborate services bore him. He knows he may not have much time. ‘Two or three years and then off to the house of the Father,’ he said this week. Was he serious? You can never tell.

That’s from an all-out detailed, informative, original rundown on Pope Francis by the prolific Damian Thompson in the (UK) Spectator, where he is associate editor.

Some especially good stuff:

Jorge Bergoglio has little in common with Joseph Ratzinger apart from an intense, orthodox Catholic faith and a love of classical music. Like many Jesuits, Francis isn’t interested in liturgy. This is actually good news for traditionalists, because it means he won’t clamp down on the Latin Mass (with one baffling exception: the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate, a new order whose use of the Old Missal has been brutally restricted). [Italics added]

And:

The Pope has declared a spiritual culture war on the bureaucrats who forced the resignation of his predecessor, the most intellectually gifted pontiff for 200 years. Cardinal Ratzinger was once known as ‘the Rottweiler’. How ludicrous that nickname seems in the light of his eight years as Pope, during which he allowed curial officials — including his incompetent secretary of state, Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone — to plunge the church deeper into financial and sexual scandal while they fought their own factional battles. Benedict was too old and too kind to knock heads together.

And more more more where that’s from . . .

“ISIS beheading children systematically”

A plea for prayers from Crisis Relief International via e-blast:

“We lost the city of Queragosh (Qaraqosh). It fell to ISIS and they are
beheading children systematically. This is the city we have been smuggling
food too. ISIS has pushed back Peshmerga (Kurdish forces) and is within 10
minutes of where our CRI team is working. Thousands more fled into the city
of Erbil last night. The UN evacuated it’s staff in Erbil. Our team is
unmoved and will stay. Prayer cover needed!”

Wow.

A Leo man is promoted to everlasting life

He is Robert L. Hylard, who cashed in at 86 and remained loyal to his school to the end.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pat Hickey tells us about him.

He was

the Kid from VIZ [Visitation parish, 55th Street] who played in Leo’s Marching Band for four years, wrote for and helped edited the school news paper the Oriole, ‘trod the boards’ in every Leo Dramatic production from junior year on, and played lightweight football on the cinders and broken beer bottle glass of Shewbridge Field – the iconic home to Leo High School football, now Amos Alonzo Stagg Elementary.

He is remembered with affection.

The young African American, Mexican and Canaryville Irish kids who now attend Mr. Hylard’s Alma Mater knew him well. Bob Hylard made all of the football home games, most of the away and every Leo High School event that showcased the talents and skills of our young men a huge mark on his calendar.

Leo remains a boys’ school, vigorously supported and operated by its mostly (S. Side) Irishers, a haven of excellence in a rough neighborhood.

More about Leo here.

Pope Francis: ‘Be Courageous, and Go to Confession’

Oh my, is this wonderful, or not?

“Don’t be afraid of confession,” Pope Francis stressed. “When someone is in line for confession, he feels all these things, even shame; but then, when he finishes confessing, he leaves (feeling) free, great, beautiful, forgiven, clean, happy.”

Pope Francis: ‘Be Courageous, and Go to Confession’

The Holy Father spoke of the healing available in the sacrament of reconciliation at his Feb. 19 audience: ‘Forgiveness is not a result of our efforts, but is a gift. It is a gift of the Holy Spirit, who showers us with mercy and grace that pours forth unceasingly from the open heart of Christ, crucified and risen.’

by CATHOLIC NEWS AGENCY 02/19/2014

VATICAN CITY — During his Wednesday audience on Feb. 19, Pope Francis encouraged the pilgrims filling St. Peter’s Square to receive the sacrament of reconciliation.
“Everyone say to himself: ‘When was the last time I went to confession?’ And if it has been a long time, don’t lose another day. Go, the priest will be good. And Jesus, (will be) there, and Jesus is better than the priests. Jesus receives you: He will receive you with so much love.”
“Be courageous, and go to confession,” urged the Pope.
Acknowledging a popular objection to the sacrament, Pope Francis noted, “Someone can say, ‘I confess my sins only to God.’ Yes, you can say to God, ‘Forgive me,’ and say your sins. But our sins are also against our brothers, against the Church. This is is why it is necessary to ask forgiveness of the Church and of our brothers, in the person of the priest.”
“While the celebration of the sacrament is personal, it is rooted in the universality of the Church,” which “accompanies us on the path of conversion,” he explained.
“Forgiveness is not something we can give ourselves,” cautioned the Pope. “One asks forgiveness; one asks it of another person, and in confession, we ask forgiveness from Jesus.”
“Forgiveness is not a result of our efforts, but is a gift. It is a gift of the Holy Spirit, who showers us with mercy and grace that pours forth unceasingly from the open heart of Christ, crucified and risen.”
The Pope went on to recognize that many people feel ashamed at the idea of confessing their sins and might say, “But Father, I am embarrased.”
“Even embarrassment is good. It’s healthy to have a bit of shame. … It does us good, because it makes us more humble.”
“Don’t be afraid of confession,” Pope Francis stressed. “When someone is in line for confession, he feels all these things, even shame; but then, when he finishes confessing, he leaves (feeling) free, great, beautiful, forgiven, clean, happy.”
“The sacrament of reconciliation is a sacrament of healing,” he pointed out.
“When I go to confession, it’s for healing: healing the soul, healing the heart, because of something that I did to make it unwell.”
The Pope pointed to the biblical story of Jesus healing a paralyzed man, which expresses the “profound link” between “forgiveness and healing,” since “the Lord Jesus is revealed at the same time as the physician of soul and body.”
He also recounted the Parable of the Prodigal Son, who sought his father’s forgiveness and was welcomed home with open arms.
“But I say to you,” he stressed to the many pilgrims, “every time we go to confession, God embraces us.”

Prayer meeting question never asked . . .

. . . but dangerously close to being asked:

In a “theology” gathering of 25 or so members of a nearby parish, we were instructed to do some heavy meditating for eight minutes, each of us at a round table for six or eight. I put my head in hands and went to it. Think of nothing but a word you decide on, hang with it for the whole time, avoiding any thoughts or images or whatever, we were advised.

Centering prayer it’s called, but I spotted it pronto for good old Transcendental Meditation of the ’70s, brought to us by the Maharishi Something, who had a spread in Iowa. I took a course in it for a story, which ran with a memorable head shot of me with my eyes closed. An action shot, you know, of a man meditating.

Tonight I went to it and managed a semi-doze that suited me nicely, until the lady in charge, a liturgy associate type, instrumentally gifted and a leader of song, rang a bell, GONG! to tell us to come out of it.

It was at that point that I was inspired by the spirit of my misspent late middle age to lift up my head, turn to the lady bell-ringer, and ask, “For whom does that bell toll?”

God saved me from such a brutal faux pas, sending a good spirit who (gasp!) provided me with a 1950s-style INHIBITION that saved the evening. Wow.

Maybe It’s Time For Modern Science To Back Off | Taking A Second Look

Maybe It’s Time For Modern Science To Back Off | Taking A Second Look.

A neatly stated case vs. cross-fertilization run wild.

Lets begin with the indisputable fact that modern science — especially in the fields of medicine and communication — has been a boon to mankind. But sometimes boon becomes bust when you overplay your hand. I think some of our scientists have. Especially when they start crowding such equally distinguished fields like Religion and the Humanities.

Etc.

Company Man: My Jesuit Life, 1950-1968

Buy it at Lulu.com.

Front cover

Whose kind of Terror Town is Chicago?

Eight shot last night in Terror Town, in Chicago’s once-white-posh South Shore neighborhood, of 19 shot in nine hours.  Coming up in tomorrow’s Sun-Times, a story about GUNS. 

Of course.  Mediums love stories about guns.  Allows them to be righteous about bad guys who supply them.  But what about shooters? 

They profile victims all the time, wringing hands about innocent people or kids who never had a chance, etc.  But do they profile shooters?  Why not?  Do him, his family, his neighborhood, IN DEPTH, as they say, or in shallow, early and often.

Blaming usual suspects if they must — gun suppliers, bad schools, right-wingers who lack sympathy, etc. — but while they are at it, the culture of dependency, the role of welfare in rewarding the father-free and in making fathers superfluous, the constant blame-whitey chatter from “Rev.” Sharpton and his ilk.

I ask too much and get carried away.  I have in mind a consulting of William Julius Wilson and his ilk, and a polling of pastors in the ‘hood.  I remember one I talked to decades ago after his long, long service, who told me of the pressure politicians put on him to gain his pulpit.  Someone candid but not blowing his horn.

A story featuring the pastors, and not just the ones who stage and lead marches, but ones the reporter — Chi Trib’s “Seeker” will do, or one of Sun-Times’s shoe-leather wearers-out, door-knockers, telephone-callers — finds by asking around, starting with denominational execs at to who’s who and trying at all times to separate wheat from chaff among them.

Can be done.  Beats the usual guns story, which I’m betting will quote Fr. Pfleger.  If the next guns story doesn’t quote him, I will eat my delete key.

 

 

 

Chickens home to roost on new religious egg

What we have here is the start of a new state religion, replete with doctrinal imperatives:

Dogma #1: A woman has the right, the unrestricted right, to make arrangements for the killing of her unborn child whenever such course of action is convenient. [I would add that abortion thereby becomes a sacrament.  Shades of Moloch.]

The others have to do with:

social recognition for romantic attraction . . . the people’s hero, Barack Hussein [as sovereign pontiff] . . . Christian faith [and especially the] Catholic Church [as new prime enemy] . . .

It’s from a St. Paul MN pastor.

 

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