Monthly Archives: May 2008

Another friend of Father Pfleger

If you want the goods on Father Pfleger, look here, at Discover the Networks, where among other things you will find this near-endorsement of Jihadism which might come as news to many readers:

On another occasion, Pfleger invited Kareem Irfan, former Chairman of the Council of Islamic Organizations of Greater Chicago, to speak at Saint Sabina on the fourth anniversary of 9/11. A member of the Islamic Society of North America, Irfan has characterized Islamic beheadings of non-Muslims not as acts of evil, but rather as manifestations of “a primordial sense of retaliation and revenge.”

Endorsement is not too strong a word.  Pfleger’s guests are not people with whom he disagrees.

Unless you think he sharply distinguishes between this, that, and the other:

Rev. Michael Pfleger invited Kareem Irfan, former chairman of the Council of Islamic Organizations of Greater Chicago, to speak to his congregation about prejudice against Muslims and Arabs in the wake of Sept. 11.

“In the name of patriotism and the Patriot Act, there was a great rising of prejudice and bigotry against Muslims and Arabs,” Pfleger said. “We cannot allow that under the guise of patriotism.”

Irfan spoke about the abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq and the denial of legal representation for those being held in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

“We’ve seen a shameful erosion of civil rights and liberties,” he said, referring to the Patriot Act’s power to allow law enforcement to use such measures as secret arrests and unrestricted wiretaps to investigate people since Sept. 11. “There’s been a distressing violation of the privacy of organizations and individuals.”

This is how it’s done, of course.  You make all-purpose bigotry the theme of your 9/11 observance.

Spiritual counselor wanted

A Long Island monsignor offers himself as Big O.’s pastor, to replace those being thrown under the bus:

Monsignor Jim Lisante of Rockville Centre, LI, praised GOP nominee Sen. John McCain and said, “A lot more of us would be comfortable with [Obama’s] judgment skills if he hadn’t sat for 20 years through the words offered by his preacher of division, bigotry . . . without a word of rejection from Sen. Obama – that is, until the media brought it up. And now he doesn’t want any part of the guy. I’m willing to be his pastor.”

A generous offer, I’d say.

On the run from us

Can this be true?  Is Harry Reid wrong?

Less than a year after his agency warned of new threats from a resurgent al-Qaeda, CIA Director Michael V. Hayden now portrays the terrorist movement as essentially defeated in Iraq and Saudi Arabia and on the defensive throughout much of the rest of the world, including in its presumed haven along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border.

That’s WaPo today, citing “major gains . . . an increasingly successful campaign.” 

Al Q has lost its mojo in the Islamic world, two years after The CIA reported “a propaganda and marketing bonanza [in Iraq] for al-Qaeda, generating cash donations and legions of volunteers.”

Thing is, things happen.  Let’s hear it for Bush policies — from the honest people.

Father Pfleger on Hillary as racist

Hillary looked like a sure thing for president, but

“. . . then out of nowhere came, hey, I’m Barack Obama. And she said, ‘Oh damn, where did you come from? I’m white. I’m entitled. There’s a black man stealing my show.’”

That’s Chicago’s own Father Pfleger Sunday in O’s Trinity Church on 95th Street, citing Hillary Clinton as a case of “white entitlement and supremacy” which he felt bound to “expose.”

Addressing Rev. Otis Moss, the Trinity pastor and successor to Rev. Jeremiah Wright, he said from the pulpit:

“Reverend Moss, when Hillary was crying, and people said that was put on, I really don’t believe it was put on. I really believe that she just always thought, ‘This is mine. I’m Bill’s wife. I’m white. And this is mine. I just got to get up and step into the plate.’

He

then mimicked Clinton crying as the audience erupted into applause and gave [him] a standing ovation.  . . . .  “She wasn’t the only one crying [he added]. There was a whole lot of white people cryin’.”  . . . .  Apparently realizing his remarks might attract media attention, Pfleger stated, “I’m sorry. I don’t want to get you into any more trouble.”

Moss thanked God for Pfleger’s comments.

Pfleger also pitched for reparations, demanding that whites give up their money to make up for slavery:

“Honestly now, to address the one who says, ‘Don’t hold me responsible for what my ancestors did.’ But you have enjoyed the benefits of what your ancestors did … and unless you are ready to give up the benefits, throw away your 401 fund, throw away your trust fund, throw away all the monies you put away into the company you walked into because your daddy and grand daddy. …”

Shouting, Pfleger continued, “Unless you are willing to give up the benefits then you must be responsible for what was done in your generation, because you are the beneficiaries of this insurance policy.”

Keeping up with Gramps

The Big O. on his grandfather in Dreams of My Father:

“Gramps returned from the war never having seen real combat, and the family moved to California, where he enrolled at Berkeley under the GI bill,” he writes. “But the classroom couldn’t contain his ambitions, his restlessness, and so the family moved again.”

The Big O. in New Mexico on Memorial Day:

“My grandfather marched in Patton’s Army, but I cannot know what it is to walk into battle like so many of you.”

The Big O. in a 2002 antiwar speech:

“My grandfather signed up for a war the day after Pearl Harbor was bombed, fought in Patton’s army. He saw the dead and dying across the fields of Europe; he heard the stories of fellow troops who first entered Auschwitz and Treblinka. He fought in the name of a larger freedom, part of that arsenal of democracy that triumphed over evil, and he did not fight in vain.”

He thinks he’s conning people in a South Side church basement.

Keeping up with Gramps

The Big O. on his grandfather in Dreams of My Father:

“Gramps returned from the war never having seen real combat, and the family moved to California, where he enrolled at Berkeley under the GI bill,” he writes. “But the classroom couldn’t contain his ambitions, his restlessness, and so the family moved again.”

The Big O. in New Mexico on Memorial Day:

“My grandfather marched in Patton’s Army, but I cannot know what it is to walk into battle like so many of you.”

The Big O. in a 2002 antiwar speech:

“My grandfather signed up for a war the day after Pearl Harbor was bombed, fought in Patton’s army. He saw the dead and dying across the fields of Europe; he heard the stories of fellow troops who first entered Auschwitz and Treblinka. He fought in the name of a larger freedom, part of that arsenal of democracy that triumphed over evil, and he did not fight in vain.”

He thinks he’s conning people in a South Side church basement.

Quit Iraq? Now, when things are going so well?

Right, Al Qaeda was not in Iraq in 2003, concedes Ralph Peters in NY Post.  “But it’s 2008, not 2003. And our next president will take office in 2009. It’s today’s reality that matters.”

To argue the 2003 scenario is “as if, in June 1944, critics had argued from facts frozen in June 1939. (‘Why invade Normandy? Hitler’s content with Czechoslovakia.’)”

War’s not like that, says Peters.

[T]he situation changes, enemies evolve and goals shift. A war to preserve the Union becomes a war to end slavery; a war to defeat one set of totalitarian systems empowers a new network of tyrannies. It’s a rare war whose end can be forecast neatly at its outset.

How many newsies are saying that?

To date, not one “mainstream media” journalist has pressed the leading advocates of unconditional surrender to describe in detail what might happen after we “bring the troops home now.”

There’s plenty of unchallenged sloganeering, but no serious debate. This selective political softball and pep-rally journalism serves neither our country nor our political process well.

Consider these items that contribute to today’s lay of the land:

* After our troops reached Baghdad, al Qaeda’s leaders made a colossal strategic miscalculation and publicly declared that Iraq was now the central front in their jihad against us. Matter of record, in the enemy’s own words.

Some Sunnis “rallied to the terrorists,” at which point:

Al Qaeda in Iraq and its affiliates then embarked on a campaign of widespread atrocities: videotaped beheadings, mass bombings of civilians, assassinations, widespread rape (of boys and girls, as well as of women), kidnappings and brutal efforts to dictate the intimate details of Iraqi lives.

. . . .  Suddenly, those American “occupiers” looked like saviors.

Millions turned against al Qaeda, U.S. and Iraqi forces defeated them,

At present, the terror organization’s own Web masters admit that al Qaeda is nearing final collapse in Iraq.

So now we quit?

Dems v. Dems = McCain profit? Not necessarily

“Even old-time Clintonites were appalled” at Hillary’s claim that RFK’s assassination in 1968 justifies her staying in the race, says Robert Novak.

The most important political impact of Clinton’s conduct is to make Sen. Barack Obama’s task as nominee more difficult. For the first time, we hear serious talk among Democrats that the party may not be fully able to join ranks at the convention in Denver in late August.

“The hostility on both sides is intense,” he says, with O. boo’d by pro-Hillary unionists in Puerto Rico and Obama-ites crying “feminists” as their enemy.  “The longer this continues, the more difficult will be reconciliation.”

This doesn’t mean McCain’s ready to capitalize on Dem disunion.

His biggest problem may be failure to realize that the Republican coalition is not fully united behind him. The most recent defectors are lobbyists expelled from his campaign who are not happy about their treatment. We continue to hear complaints from evangelicals, economic conservatives, and other critics of McCain. The refrain continues from conservatives that maybe the country and the GOP need four years of Obama.

Great.

Al-baloney

Vaclav Klaus, the Czech Republic’s gift to common sense and overall smarts, would like to debate Al (there’s-money-in-global-warming) Gore, but G. is not interested.  It would only elevate the skeptics, he says, as John Fund reports in Wall Street Journal’s Political Diary.

But he may have another motivation for avoiding Mr. Klaus [writes Fund]. As the late William F. Buckley once put it, “Why does bologna reject the grinder?”

Klaus yesterday likened cap-and-traders (limiters by fiat of carbon emissions) to promoting a program such as Soviets imposed on his country.

Yes.  Central planners are all alike — like smokers at their pettin’ parties and poker games.  They just gotta have another way to run things.

Later: Here’s another approach:

Conservative grassroots group Grassfire.org wants people to waste as much energy as possible on June 12 by “hosting a barbecue, going for a drive, watching television, leaving a few lights on, or even smoking a few cigars.”

The point: the group wants to “help Americans break free from the ‘carbon footprint guilt’ being imposed by Climate Alarmists.”

Yes, a sort of kill-the-guilt program.

 

Assaulting a battery

We do learn things if we are only patient.  Young man at Radio Shack on Madison Street said I should charge my new nickel cadmium battery for our wireless house phone for 12 hours before removing it from the charger.  Fine.  But he also said I should then remove it and let it wholly discharge before I replaced it for recharging.

This part I found suspicious. I’m not supposed to leave the wireless house phone on its cradle all the time?  No, he said patiently, and happily, I did not argue with him but forked over the $16–plus and took a new battery on home, charging it for 12 hours but leaving it in the charger!

Because I didn’t believe him, you see.  But when I finally did remove it, a few days later, I noticed something very suspicious: the phone was hot in my hand.  That can’t be right, I considered briefly, and decided to leave it off the charger.

Well.  The young man, already looking smarter, looked even smarter when I found this with a little Googling — “recharging nickel cadmium battery” was my signal to the world’s fastest answer machine, or one of the fastest:

Do not leave the battery on the charger for extended periods of time, this causes cells to “boil” and will quickly ruin a battery.

I found it here, where it’s part of the wireless.berkeley.edu site, which I assume is U-Cal Berkeley, under “battery care.”

What’s going on that makes a battery boil?

Always fully discharge your battery before recharging it, this excercises all of the cells in the battery so they are less likely to build dendrides, which are the cause of “memory effect”. Memory Effect- battery loses capacity and begins to use only the cells that are fully charged and discharged regularly, resulting in poor battery performance and eventually failure.

I did not know all that was going on, was in fact blithely unaware of it. 

But: You can’t be running to the charger every time it runs out.  It’s a lot to ask, you say, boiling point or not?  The Berkeley fellow recommends

a device called Pulse Power Rapid Charger & Conditioner, [which] has been proven to erase “memory effect” in most bad batteries, and increases the life cycle of healthy batteries from 200 charging cycles, to 500 or more charging cycles. Unit automatically charges, shuts off, and maintains battery charge with no buttons or switches to push. You can leave a battery on the Pulse Power indefinitely and cannot overcharge it.

Excellent.  I do not wish to overcharge my battery.  It’s a terrible thing to be overcharged anyhow.  So me for the Pulse Power Rapid Charger & Conditioner, which sounds wonderful.  I will look into that and report back, especially if I find one for human beings.  Couldn’t we all use some rapid charging and conditioning?

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