Pope Francis’ way of governance: Crafty, unpredictable, keeping possible enemies off balance

As described by veteran Vatican analyst Andrea Gagliarducci in his VaticanMonday  blog:

Pope Francis’ communication is centered on himself. The Pope’s interviews are about what the Pope thinks, and what he corroborates with pieces of Church history. The other popes’ starting point was the Church, always taking a step back from the role they held. Even with John Paul II, despite his evident charisma gathering crowds.

Pope Francis’ was, therefore, a change of epoch. In addition to [how he has] kept his distance from problems, there are some contradictions . . .

Vatican expert Sandro Magister has noted a disparity of treatment, for example, in three particular circumstances: the question of the Order of Malta; how the Community of Sant’Egidio is treated; and the expulsion from the community of Bose of his founder, Brother Enzo Bianchi, who was also considered a friend of Pope Francis, and whom the Pope had wanted at the Synods on the family.

These . . .  examples show that there are no people whom the Pope always considers friends. Even the personal secretaries of Pope Francis have changed throughout the pontificate. This is because Pope Francis wants to manage everything personally. His strategy is to take power away from others. And so, no one has control.

The particular secretaries do not have it, destined to be replaced and in any case unaware of the Pope’s many appointments. The dicastery heads do not have it, uncertain about the Pope’s decisions, and destined not to remain for more than two five-year terms. Not even the local bishops have it, forced to navigate precariously, hoping not to make serious mistakes.

See more here . . .